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Dates: high in fibre and rich in B vitamins and iron

Dates: high in fibre and rich in B vitamins and iron

The humble date often makes an appearance at Christmas – about the only time of year that you seem to be able to buy the gorgeous, sticky, squidgy Medjool style date, as opposed to the small, shrivelled, dry ones you are forced to be content with the rest of the year round!
Dates are a fruit in their own right, not the dried version of something else.  Although higher in calories than most fresh fruits, they do also contain a fantastic range of nutritional benefits and so are definitely a good alternative to chocolate if you are craving something sweet this Christmas.

NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS
Fibre: dates are high in fibre which helps our digestive systems to function smoothly (pardon the pun!), prevents constipation, promotes gut health and also can help to reduce cholesterol levels in the blood.

B Vitamins: Dates contain a good amount of niacin, riboflavin and folate. These are all part of the B Vitamin family which help to support a range of bodily functions.

Riboflavin (B2): supports the health of the nervous system and can help promote skin and eye health as well as helping our bodies to release the energy from carbohydrate.

Niacin (B3): helps to promote the health of the digestive and nervous systems

Folate: helps to support Vitamin B12 to promote the production and health of red blood cells, therefore supporting the transport of oxygen to the muscles and preventing fatigue. It is also a vital vitamin during pregnancy as it prevents conditions such as spina bifida from developing in newborns.

Iron: Dates contain a decent amount of iron; any foods containing iron are good to eat as this is one of the minerals that we can so easily become deficient in, especially if we do not eat meat. Iron helps to build red blood cells which carry oxygen to muscles as a source of energy. If we are deficient in iron we can develop anaemia, a symptom of which is extreme fatigue and lack of energy.

Calcium: Dates contain a small amount of calcium, which promotes bone health, growth and development and is involved in cardiac function, so can help to keep the heart strong and healthy.

HOW TO STUFF A DATE!

Tasty and a more nutritious Xmas snack than chocolate!

Tasty and a more nutritious Xmas snack than chocolate!

Easy!  
1. Slice the date down one side, being careful not to cut all the way through as you want to keep it whole.  

2. Carefully remove the stone.  A good treat here, as there is often some date flesh still on the stone – it’s chef’s perogative to suck the stones!  Just as satisfying as licking the spoon!

3. Take one whole almond, pistachio, walnut half, cashew or a nut of your choosing and place this where the stone used to be.  Alternatively, stuff the cavity with chopped nuts.

4. Roll the stuffed date in grated coconut or sprinkle some on top for a delicious treat and a beautiful festive, snowy look

5. Alternative stuffings are: 
*  cream cheese (low fat, if you want to keep it healthy)
*  blue cheese
*  thick, lowfat greek style yogurt and honey
*  bacon, wrapped around the date like pigs-in-blankets (obviously the bacon needs to be cooked first)

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
per one date, stuffed with an almond and rolled in coconut (per one date stuffed with blue cheese)

Energy                    93kcal / 389kJ (86kcal / 360 kJ)
Carbohydrate      8.1g (7.8g)
Fat                            2.5g (1.5g)
Protein                   1.0g (1.4g)
Sugars                     8.0g (7.8g)
Saturates               1.2g (1.0g)
Fibre                        1.0g (0.5g)
Salt                          Trace (Trace)

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If you love food and hate the idea of wasting anything then I am starting a series of ‘Waste Not Want Not’ blog posts, in honour of the ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ national campaign to get people shopping and cooking smart to prevent food waste and save people money.

In the UK the average household throws away £480 of food waste per year (£680 for a family with 2 children) and almost half of this is estimated to be food that we could have eaten. The foods we waste the most are vegetables, fruit, drinks and bakery items such as bread and cakes.  A lot of the wastage is down to either preparing too much food and having to throw it away or buying too much food in the first place.

The Love Food Hate Waste website has some brilliant ideas, including recipes and ways to store food better, to prevent waste and save us all money.

Here are my suggestions for something that tends to sit in the fridge for a long time in our house….the humble jar of mint sauce (please note, this is not the same as mint jelly – mint sauce is more of a vinegar-based dressing usually used with lamb).

A zesty, tangy way to use up courgettes

A zesty, tangy way to use up courgettes

1. Courgette and mint salad
Serves 2-4

  • Trim the ends off 1 courgette and grate it lengthways into wide(ish) strips.
  • Thinly slice 4 spring onions. 
  • Make a dressing out of 1 tsp. olive oil, 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar, 2-3 tsp. lemon juice (fresh or bottled), fresh black pepper and a tsp. of mint sauce. 
  • Mix courgette into the dressing. 
  • You could add bits of diced red pepper too. 

 

 

A delicious warming, low fat dish

A delicious warming, low fat dish

 

2. Pea, Mint and Ham Soup

Serves 4

This is a recipe I have previously posted on Relish Health’s blog (September 2013)

Pea Mint and Ham Soup

 

 

 

3. Yogurt and mint dip

Mix 4 tbsps of low fat plain or greek yogurt with 1 tsp of mint sauce, 1 tsp lemon juice, ¼ – ½ tsp of ground chilli powder and a handful of coriander chopped fine. 

Use this as a salad dressing for tinned chickpeas mixed up with diced spring onions, red pepper, and shredded roast chicken or as a dip for falafel or samosas.  If you want to have a thinner sauce, blend – it will go a nice shade of green.

 

4.  Mix 1/2 – 1 tsp. of mint sauce into a portion of fresh or frozen garden peas to serve as a side to your sunday roast.

 

5.  Mix 1/2 – 1 tsp. of mint sauce with 1/2 – 1tsp of melted butter or olive-oil based spread. Dress some boiled new potatoes with this mixture and serve with your sunday roast or on the side of some baked or grilled white fish (haddock, cod, bass, bream, etc.)