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Tag Archives: salad

If you love food and hate the idea of wasting anything then I am starting a series of ‘Waste Not Want Not’ blog posts, in honour of the ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ national campaign to get people shopping and cooking smart to prevent food waste and save people money.

In the UK the average household throws away £480 of food waste per year (£680 for a family with 2 children) and almost half of this is estimated to be food that we could have eaten. The foods we waste the most are vegetables, fruit, drinks and bakery items such as bread and cakes.  A lot of the wastage is down to either preparing too much food and having to throw it away or buying too much food in the first place.

The Love Food Hate Waste website has some brilliant ideas, including recipes and ways to store food better, to prevent waste and save us all money.

Here are my suggestions for something that tends to sit in the fridge for a long time in our house….the humble jar of mint sauce (please note, this is not the same as mint jelly – mint sauce is more of a vinegar-based dressing usually used with lamb).

A zesty, tangy way to use up courgettes

A zesty, tangy way to use up courgettes

1. Courgette and mint salad
Serves 2-4

  • Trim the ends off 1 courgette and grate it lengthways into wide(ish) strips.
  • Thinly slice 4 spring onions. 
  • Make a dressing out of 1 tsp. olive oil, 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar, 2-3 tsp. lemon juice (fresh or bottled), fresh black pepper and a tsp. of mint sauce. 
  • Mix courgette into the dressing. 
  • You could add bits of diced red pepper too. 

 

 

A delicious warming, low fat dish

A delicious warming, low fat dish

 

2. Pea, Mint and Ham Soup

Serves 4

This is a recipe I have previously posted on Relish Health’s blog (September 2013)

Pea Mint and Ham Soup

 

 

 

3. Yogurt and mint dip

Mix 4 tbsps of low fat plain or greek yogurt with 1 tsp of mint sauce, 1 tsp lemon juice, ¼ – ½ tsp of ground chilli powder and a handful of coriander chopped fine. 

Use this as a salad dressing for tinned chickpeas mixed up with diced spring onions, red pepper, and shredded roast chicken or as a dip for falafel or samosas.  If you want to have a thinner sauce, blend – it will go a nice shade of green.

 

4.  Mix 1/2 – 1 tsp. of mint sauce into a portion of fresh or frozen garden peas to serve as a side to your sunday roast.

 

5.  Mix 1/2 – 1 tsp. of mint sauce with 1/2 – 1tsp of melted butter or olive-oil based spread. Dress some boiled new potatoes with this mixture and serve with your sunday roast or on the side of some baked or grilled white fish (haddock, cod, bass, bream, etc.)

 


Serves 4

Delicious, crunchy and packed with fibre, protein, iron and folate.

Delicious, crunchy and packed with fibre, protein, iron and folate.

With the weather starting to turn warmer, even if only sporadically and for 2-3 days out of every month in the UK, this weekend was so beautiful that it just wasn’t soupy weather!  I decided to make a nice salad instead – my staple lunch during the summer months being a plate of different mixed salads like those you might see in a health food/wholefood cafe.

You can use green or brown lentils in this salad and these types are especially good in salads and casseroles because they hold their shape well after cooking (yellow and red lentils or split peas have a tendency to go mushy making them better in soups and dahls). They also lend it a really nice crunchy texture and nutty flavour which goes beautifully with the crunchy fresh veggies and parsley.

 

I would eat this salad as a meal on its own, maybe with a tbsp. of low fat hummus, lettuce, cucumber, cherry tomatoes and ½ pitta bread. I have eaten it on the side of a main meal such as baked fish or chicken, lasagne, moussaka or as part of a salad plate with other salads in which case I would have 1-2 tbsps. of salad rather than a large plateful. I have included the nutritional information for the whole recipe here so that you can make your own calculations if you decide to portion the salad differently; e.g. if you were to eat it on the side of a main meal rather than as a salad meal in its own right.Lentils are high in fibre, protein and a multitude of vitamins and minerals including iron, folate and calcium. They are low in fat and, because of the high fibre and protein contents, they can really help your stomach to feel fuller for longer making them a great addition to a lunch time meal as this can curb those afternoon snack cravings.

Normally you would find lentils dried and sold in bags ready for cooking although some supermarkets and specialist food stores such as south Asian supermarkets sell them already cooked in cans. I have used dried lentils so I needed to cook them – if you used canned lentils just miss out the first step and be aware that the canning process probably added extra salt to the overall nutritional content as a preservative.

Ingredients
200g dried green lentils or 2 cans cooked, drained green lentils (480g)
1 red pepper, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
1 red onion, chopped (or equivalent amount of chopped spring onions)
1 garlic clove, finely diced
2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped

1 tbsp. olive oil
1.5 tbsp. white wine or cider vinegar
1 tsp. runny honey
2 tsp. lemon juice
Some grated lemon zest (optional)
Ground black pepper

Instructions
1.  Place the lentils in a saucepan with 3 times the amount of cold water as lentils. Bring the water to a boil then reduce the heat and boil gently for 35 – 45 minutes, or until the lentils are soft but retain a bit of crunch. Remove from heat, drain off the water and allow to cool for later.

2.  Finely chop the vegetables and parsley – these will stay raw so small is better unless you particularly like to eat large chunks of raw onion! Mix these together in a big bowl.

3.  In a small bowl, mix together the oil, vinegar, honey, lemon juice, lemon zest (if using) and black pepper. Make sure the honey is well blended with the rest of the ingredients.

4.  Pour the dressing over the vegetables and add the cooked lentils once they have cooled sufficiently.

5.  Stir everything together and put the salad in the fridge for an hour or two to allow the dressing to infuse the vegetables with flavour.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
per whole recipe

Energy        870 kcal / 3645 kJ
Carbohydrate    132.4g
Fat            15.4g
Protein        54.4g
Total sugar    31.7g
Saturates        3.4g
Fibre            26.0g
Salt            0.1g (check canned lentils for added salt)

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
per serving (if serving 4)

Energy        220 kcal / 911 kJ
Carbohydrate    33.1g
Fat            3.9g
Protein        13.6g
Total sugar    7.9g
Saturates        0.9g
Fibre            6.5g
Salt            Trace (check canned lentils for added salt)